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Texas schools punish students who refuse to be tracked with microchips
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A school district in Texas came under fire earlier this year when it announced that it would require students to wear microchip-embedded ID cards at all times. Now, students who refuse to be monitored say they are feeling the repercussions.
Since October 1, students at John Jay High School and Anson Jones Middle School in San Antonio, Texas, have been asked to attend class with photo ID cards equipped with radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips to track every pupil’s location. Educators insist that the endeavor is being rolled out in Texas to stem the rampant truancy devastating the school’s funding. If the program is judged successful, the RFID chips could soon come to 112 schools in all and affect nearly 100,000 students.
Students who refuse to walk the school halls with the card in their pocket or around their neck claim they are being tormented by instructors, and are barred from participating in certain school functions. Some also said they were turned away from common areas like cafeterias and libraries.
Andrea Hernandez, a sophomore at John Jay, said educators have ignored her pleas to respect her privacy and told her she cannot participate in school elections if she refuses to comply with the tracking program.
Hernandez said in an interview with Salon that subjecting herself to constant monitoring through an RFID chip is like being branded with the “mark of the beast” – a reference to the Bible’s apocalyptic Book of Revelations. When she reached out to WND with the school’s response, though, she said that she was threatened with not being allowed to vote for her school’s homecoming king and queen for disobeying the student ID rule.
"I had a teacher tell me I would not be allowed to vote because I did not have the proper voter ID," Hernandez told WND. “I had my old student ID card which they originally told us would be good for the entire four years we were in school. He said I needed the new ID with the chip in order to vote.”
After Hernandez refused to wear an RFID chip, WND reported that Deputy Superintendent Ray Galindo issued a statement to the girl’s parents: “We are simply asking your daughter to wear an ID badge as every other student and adult on the Jay campus is asked to do.” If she is allowed to forego the tracking now, the repercussions will be harsher than just revoking voting rights for homecoming contests once the school makes location-monitoring mandatory, he argued.
“I urge you to accept this solution so that your child’s instructional program will not be affected. As we discussed, there will be consequences for refusal to wear an ID card as we begin to move forward with full implementation,” Galindo wrote.
The girl’s father, Steve Hernandez, told WND that the school was somewhat willing to work with his daughter, but said that the family is unwilling to “agree to stop criticizing the program” and publically endorse it.
“I told him that was unacceptable because it would imply an endorsement of the district’s policy and my daughter and I should not have to give up our constitutional rights to speak out against a program that we feel is wrong,” Mr. Hernandez responded.
The Northside Independent School District expects to collect upwards of $2 million in state funding by reversing its poor attendance figures, with the RFID program costing around one-quarter of that sum to initiate and another $136,005 in maintenance. The new funding may not offset the other damages that could arise: Heather Fazio of Texans for Accountable Government told WND that she filed a Freedom of Information Act request for $30 and received the names and addresses of every student in the school district.
“Using this information along with an RFID reader means a predator could use this information to determine if the student is at home and then track them wherever they go. These chips are always broadcasting so anyone with a reader can track them anywhere,” she said.
Kirsten Bokenkamp of the ACLU told the San Antonio Express-News earlier this year that her organization expected to challenge the board’s decision to use the tracking system, but the school went ahead with the program undeterred. Steve Hernandez told WND that he approached the ACLU abour representing his daughter’s case, but Rebecca Robertson of a local branch of the organization said that, “the ACLU of Texas will not be able to represent you or your daughter in this matter,” saying the case did not meet the group’s criteria.

Student’s these days don’t appreciate the freedom of being tracked with microchip embedded identity cards.
Fucking commies

Texas schools punish students who refuse to be tracked with microchips

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A school district in Texas came under fire earlier this year when it announced that it would require students to wear microchip-embedded ID cards at all times. Now, students who refuse to be monitored say they are feeling the repercussions.

Since October 1, students at John Jay High School and Anson Jones Middle School in San Antonio, Texas, have been asked to attend class with photo ID cards equipped with radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips to track every pupil’s location. Educators insist that the endeavor is being rolled out in Texas to stem the rampant truancy devastating the school’s funding. If the program is judged successful, the RFID chips could soon come to 112 schools in all and affect nearly 100,000 students.

Students who refuse to walk the school halls with the card in their pocket or around their neck claim they are being tormented by instructors, and are barred from participating in certain school functions. Some also said they were turned away from common areas like cafeterias and libraries.

Andrea Hernandez, a sophomore at John Jay, said educators have ignored her pleas to respect her privacy and told her she cannot participate in school elections if she refuses to comply with the tracking program.

Hernandez said in an interview with Salon that subjecting herself to constant monitoring through an RFID chip is like being branded with the “mark of the beast” – a reference to the Bible’s apocalyptic Book of Revelations. When she reached out to WND with the school’s response, though, she said that she was threatened with not being allowed to vote for her school’s homecoming king and queen for disobeying the student ID rule.

"I had a teacher tell me I would not be allowed to vote because I did not have the proper voter ID," Hernandez told WND. “I had my old student ID card which they originally told us would be good for the entire four years we were in school. He said I needed the new ID with the chip in order to vote.”

After Hernandez refused to wear an RFID chip, WND reported that Deputy Superintendent Ray Galindo issued a statement to the girl’s parents: “We are simply asking your daughter to wear an ID badge as every other student and adult on the Jay campus is asked to do.” If she is allowed to forego the tracking now, the repercussions will be harsher than just revoking voting rights for homecoming contests once the school makes location-monitoring mandatory, he argued.

“I urge you to accept this solution so that your child’s instructional program will not be affected. As we discussed, there will be consequences for refusal to wear an ID card as we begin to move forward with full implementation,” Galindo wrote.

The girl’s father, Steve Hernandez, told WND that the school was somewhat willing to work with his daughter, but said that the family is unwilling to “agree to stop criticizing the program” and publically endorse it.

“I told him that was unacceptable because it would imply an endorsement of the district’s policy and my daughter and I should not have to give up our constitutional rights to speak out against a program that we feel is wrong,” Mr. Hernandez responded.

The Northside Independent School District expects to collect upwards of $2 million in state funding by reversing its poor attendance figures, with the RFID program costing around one-quarter of that sum to initiate and another $136,005 in maintenance. The new funding may not offset the other damages that could arise: Heather Fazio of Texans for Accountable Government told WND that she filed a Freedom of Information Act request for $30 and received the names and addresses of every student in the school district.

“Using this information along with an RFID reader means a predator could use this information to determine if the student is at home and then track them wherever they go. These chips are always broadcasting so anyone with a reader can track them anywhere,” she said.

Kirsten Bokenkamp of the ACLU told the San Antonio Express-News earlier this year that her organization expected to challenge the board’s decision to use the tracking system, but the school went ahead with the program undeterred. Steve Hernandez told WND that he approached the ACLU abour representing his daughter’s case, but Rebecca Robertson of a local branch of the organization said that, “the ACLU of Texas will not be able to represent you or your daughter in this matter,” saying the case did not meet the group’s criteria.

Student’s these days don’t appreciate the freedom of being tracked with microchip embedded identity cards.

Fucking commies

  1. lerahl reblogged this from stagbeetleloveit and added:
    NO. No No No. Not no to the “Tracking of students” No to the parents and whoever wrote this article and have no idea how...
  2. demonpyromaniac reblogged this from tarrloks-butt and added:
    Well, this is fucking creepy. Especially because for only $30, any child predator can have a whole database in order to...
  3. tarrloks-butt reblogged this from aiffe and added:
    jesus christ this shit’s like what you see out of a dystopian sci-fi novel but it’s happening now disgusting
  4. aiffe reblogged this from princessnijireiki and added:
    Something I have been trying to tell people for years: if you do something to children and teens, something which no...
  5. digitallyinclined reblogged this from weeaboo-chan and added:
    I am severely disappointed with my old high school and I feel grateful I graduated when I did. This is just ridiculous.
  6. karmaofmytits reblogged this from karnythia
  7. boneslikemine reblogged this from astrokyon
  8. problematize reblogged this from karnythia
  9. notthehelplesslittlegirl reblogged this from danikasapphistry
  10. poetryandcurls reblogged this from neptunelovedme
  11. neptunelovedme reblogged this from gandalftheshepard
  12. geekmystic reblogged this from minathevampireslayer
  13. minathevampireslayer reblogged this from thelastmanipulation
  14. thelastmanipulation reblogged this from markdoesstuff
  15. nomderp reblogged this from martian-girl-from-planet-v and added:
    And so it begins… they’re turning us into paid slaves. Not that they haven’t been already
  16. firexproof reblogged this from aghoulistmike
  17. martian-girl-from-planet-v reblogged this from bornofelectric and added:
    ^Right? It makes me wonder, though, did the parents of the students sign to consent to this? Did they even ask the...
  18. sdgrave reblogged this from aghoulistmike
  19. fappy reblogged this from tofueggsandbakey
  20. tofueggsandbakey reblogged this from aghoulistmike
  21. aghoulistmike reblogged this from basedceerex
  22. caidenvonputtingfoot reblogged this from cannibalcoalition
  23. wide-worlds-joy reblogged this from keelanrosa
  24. keelanrosa reblogged this from hashtagthatsreal and added:
    Microwaves will probably work better than washing machines. Car might work, i’ve heard you can smash RFIDs with a hammer...
  25. vampirefinch reblogged this from muninandhugin and added:
    Signs that you grew up in a fundamentalist church: you hear tracking microchip, you think “mark of the beast” Anyway, I...
  26. fantasticalchemy reblogged this from we-allwantsomething-beautiful
  27. zeralas reblogged this from maesio
  28. significant--figures reblogged this from ynannarising
  29. bedstuybetty reblogged this from mckswift and added:
    Never never never. I rebuke it.
  30. slackmcnasty reblogged this from ynannarising
  31. we-allwantsomething-beautiful reblogged this from ynannarising
  32. ynannarising reblogged this from mckswift
  33. cakeandpi reblogged this from apollyptica
  34. mckswift reblogged this from karnythia
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