October 1 2014
Post has 1 notes
Video

Party Monster

Question
I'll support your "boredom" explanation. On certain remote postings I've had, where there's very little to do in downtime, the main passtimes were to drink on base, or leave and drink in the nearest podunk. There's just very little else to do.

yezzir

October 1 2014
Post has 40269 notes
empressie
Video

empressie:

sighinastorm:

vinebox:

if girls acted towards guys the same way guys act towards girls

I think plenty of guys would be fine with this style of approach.

YOU CAN’T EVEN SEE THE DICK THO. I HAVE TRIED MANY A TIME

i would laugh really hard if i encountered this lol

Photoset

Anti-gamergate people on twitter are pranking the fuck out of Milo Yiannopoulos right now lol

https://twitter.com/virgiltexas/status/517042140007137280
https://twitter.com/thwphipps/status/510467685277523969

October 1 2014
Post has 23 notes
rtamerica
Photo
zoom rtamerica:

US Secret Service director resigns after series of scandals
Secret Service Director Julia Perison resigned from her post atop the security detail in charge of protecting United States President Barack Obama on Wednesday following several recent serious breaches.

rtamerica:

US Secret Service director resigns after series of scandals

Secret Service Director Julia Perison resigned from her post atop the security detail in charge of protecting United States President Barack Obama on Wednesday following several recent serious breaches.

October 1 2014
Post has 14 notes
arkaimcity
Photo
zoom arkaimcity:

Alcoholism
Map: Geographic Distribution of the Oriental ALDH2*504Lys (nee 487Lys) Variant
Like everything, alcoholism is heritable; approximately 50% to 64% of the variability in alcoholism liability is associated with genetic factors. [1], [2]. Moreover, in a review of meta analyses, substance abuse was found to have high heritabilities in the 60% to 75% range, for alcoholism, cannabis use, cocaine, and heroin. Environmental factors shared by family members had insignificant influence [3]. That is, for substance abuse (and virtually every human behavioural and/or psychological trait ever documented), it’s the genes people share, not examples set by their parents, that explains the relationship between parents and their biological children. Correlation studies that suggest the latter do not subtract for hereditary; they aren’t bothering to assess causation.
People in every population have problems with alcohol. Some more than others. Hunter-gatherer populations in particular all seem to have serious problems with alcohol: The Hadza, Bushmen, Pygmies, Australian Aboriginals, Andaman islanders, and Eskimos all have a high percentage of heavy drinkers.
The pattern is clear: populations with low or nonexistent historical exposure to alcohol have higher rates of alcoholism. This isn’t that surprising, if you adhere to genetics. Alcoholic beverages are mostly made from domesticated plants and hunter-gatherers haven’t had much historical exposure to them.
You should be interested in your ancestral diet, that is, what foods your ancestors were eating. You will most likely deal with them better than someone with no such ancestry. You may be resistant to the toxins in any such food. You might be less likely to overindulge in them (in this example, ethanol). You may be better than average at making use of its nutrients (lactase persistence, for instance).
Alcoholism is also famously troublesome for native Americans—one in ten of their deaths are alcohol related—about four times as common as in the general US population, this is despite the fact that a higher percentage of whites drink (see table). Then again, whites have had thousands of years to adapt.
In East Asia, many people have a bunged-up version of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, the enzyme that converts acetaldehyde into acetate (after alcohol has been converted into acetaldehyde). This makes drinking so uncomfortable that carriers are highly resistant to alcoholism:

The map of this post shows the distribution of the East Asian ALDH2*504Lys allele, which is best known for providing protection against alcoholism.

So in China a single gene (which has experienced strong selective pressures) alone provides resistance to alcoholism, in other populations, resistance to alcoholism is polygenic—no single gene of large effect, instead many genes of small effect. Most of the interesting human traits (e.g., intelligence) are polygenic.
East Asians get drunk easier/faster because their version of alcohol dehydrogenase is less (more?) efficient. Ethanol has a three-step metabolism – ethanol to acetaldehyde to acetic acid. The East Asian allele of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase that is less efficient (or at least slower, efficiency meaning energy->work conversion rather than time) at converting acetaldehyde to acetic acid.
In other cases, the MAOA-LPR low activity gene variant increases risk for alcoholism, but only following childhood abuse. This is an example of a genotype–environment correlation (rGE). That is, sexually abused women who were homozygous (alleles coding for the same trait) for the low activity allele had higher rates of alcoholism and antisocial personality disorder/ASPD symptoms, than abused women homozygous for the high activity allele. Heterozygous women display an intermediate risk pattern.
The 2-repeat allele of the same MAOA gene also significantly impacts criminality in blacks, but that’s one of those facts that just cannot exist.
Not only is genetics involved in different rates of alcoholism, its sustenance differs in different populations. This leaves little room for the notion that those apparent ‘alcoholics’ are people simply failing to take responsibility for their own selfish, voluntary decisions based on their own free will, when they continue to drink excessively, but shh, don’t tell the libertarians…

fascnitign……
 Though I’d argue that being part of a minority ethnicity largely in isolated locations would lend itself to pressures of alcoholism rather than it being purely genetic. Most contemporary hunter gatherer societies are such because they reside in locations that are hostile to sedentary living signatures like agriculture and ranching. If I grew up in Iqaluit, a town of a few thousand people (mostly inuit), several thousand kilometres away from heavily populated locations, often barraged by extreme weather conditions, I too would find myself dipping into substances to deal with the crushing isolation and boredom. Even in similarly small, yet largely European populated towns in the Canadian north, I’ve personally witnessed rampant alcoholism. From testimony I know it’s from boredom. Usually youth pick up rampant drinking and substance abuse from the lack of outlets for their energy and that often continues onwards as a dependence for the rest of their life.
I can believe that some ethnicities/haplogroups, given geographic circumstance of low exposure, have low tolerance to some consumable substances (see: lactose intolerance among ethnicities that don’t have a long ancestry immersed in high carb/grain and dairy sedentary living conditions), but genetics alone doesn’t really lend itself to entirely explaining abuse of substances. I feel that here there’s a lot of correlation yet nothing indicating complete causation.
Otherwise, i like this post. Neato considerations

arkaimcity:

Alcoholism

Like everything, alcoholism is heritable; approximately 50% to 64% of the variability in alcoholism liability is associated with genetic factors. [1], [2]. Moreover, in a review of meta analyses, substance abuse was found to have high heritabilities in the 60% to 75% range, for alcoholism, cannabis use, cocaine, and heroin. Environmental factors shared by family members had insignificant influence [3]. That is, for substance abuse (and virtually every human behavioural and/or psychological trait ever documented), it’s the genes people share, not examples set by their parents, that explains the relationship between parents and their biological children. Correlation studies that suggest the latter do not subtract for hereditary; they aren’t bothering to assess causation.

People in every population have problems with alcohol. Some more than others. Hunter-gatherer populations in particular all seem to have serious problems with alcohol: The Hadza, Bushmen, Pygmies, Australian Aboriginals, Andaman islanders, and Eskimos all have a high percentage of heavy drinkers.

The pattern is clear: populations with low or nonexistent historical exposure to alcohol have higher rates of alcoholism. This isn’t that surprising, if you adhere to genetics. Alcoholic beverages are mostly made from domesticated plants and hunter-gatherers haven’t had much historical exposure to them.

You should be interested in your ancestral diet, that is, what foods your ancestors were eating. You will most likely deal with them better than someone with no such ancestry. You may be resistant to the toxins in any such food. You might be less likely to overindulge in them (in this example, ethanol). You may be better than average at making use of its nutrients (lactase persistence, for instance).

Alcoholism is also famously troublesome for native Americans—one in ten of their deaths are alcohol related—about four times as common as in the general US population, this is despite the fact that a higher percentage of whites drink (see table). Then again, whites have had thousands of years to adapt.

In East Asia, many people have a bunged-up version of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, the enzyme that converts acetaldehyde into acetate (after alcohol has been converted into acetaldehyde). This makes drinking so uncomfortable that carriers are highly resistant to alcoholism:

So in China a single gene (which has experienced strong selective pressures) alone provides resistance to alcoholism, in other populations, resistance to alcoholism is polygenic—no single gene of large effect, instead many genes of small effect. Most of the interesting human traits (e.g., intelligence) are polygenic.

East Asians get drunk easier/faster because their version of alcohol dehydrogenase is less (more?) efficient. Ethanol has a three-step metabolism – ethanol to acetaldehyde to acetic acid. The East Asian allele of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase that is less efficient (or at least slower, efficiency meaning energy->work conversion rather than time) at converting acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

In other cases, the MAOA-LPR low activity gene variant increases risk for alcoholism, but only following childhood abuse. This is an example of a genotype–environment correlation (rGE). That is, sexually abused women who were homozygous (alleles coding for the same trait) for the low activity allele had higher rates of alcoholism and antisocial personality disorder/ASPD symptoms, than abused women homozygous for the high activity allele. Heterozygous women display an intermediate risk pattern.

The 2-repeat allele of the same MAOA gene also significantly impacts criminality in blacks, but that’s one of those facts that just cannot exist.

Not only is genetics involved in different rates of alcoholism, its sustenance differs in different populations. This leaves little room for the notion that those apparent ‘alcoholics’ are people simply failing to take responsibility for their own selfish, voluntary decisions based on their own free will, when they continue to drink excessively, but shh, don’t tell the libertarians…

fascnitign……

 Though I’d argue that being part of a minority ethnicity largely in isolated locations would lend itself to pressures of alcoholism rather than it being purely genetic. Most contemporary hunter gatherer societies are such because they reside in locations that are hostile to sedentary living signatures like agriculture and ranching. If I grew up in Iqaluit, a town of a few thousand people (mostly inuit), several thousand kilometres away from heavily populated locations, often barraged by extreme weather conditions, I too would find myself dipping into substances to deal with the crushing isolation and boredom. Even in similarly small, yet largely European populated towns in the Canadian north, I’ve personally witnessed rampant alcoholism. From testimony I know it’s from boredom. Usually youth pick up rampant drinking and substance abuse from the lack of outlets for their energy and that often continues onwards as a dependence for the rest of their life.

I can believe that some ethnicities/haplogroups, given geographic circumstance of low exposure, have low tolerance to some consumable substances (see: lactose intolerance among ethnicities that don’t have a long ancestry immersed in high carb/grain and dairy sedentary living conditions), but genetics alone doesn’t really lend itself to entirely explaining abuse of substances. I feel that here there’s a lot of correlation yet nothing indicating complete causation.

Otherwise, i like this post. Neato considerations

October 1 2014
Post has 2 notes
By: Anonymous
Question
Question
Why are commercial flights out of affected parts of Africa still being allowed to enter Western countries? I've read that passengers are being screened for fevers before and after the flight, but the virus has an incubation period of up to 21 days. Why are these parts of Africa not being quarantined?

i dunno

perhaps such a measure would be too extreme at the moment.

September 30 2014
By: Anonymous
Question
Question
it's cool guy! Cool guyyyyyyyyyy
September 30 2014
Post has 1 notes
By: spookmaster85
Question
Question
ITS COOL GUY
September 30 2014
Post has 2 notes
By: anotora
Question
Question
I just wanna say thank you for being the person who put the Ron Paul image at the end of the "girls deserve multiple orgasms" text post, because it cracks me up every single time it shows up on my dash, which it does often, because most people don't realize he was an OB-GYN. You are a comic genius.

lol which one was that

following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following following